Chloe’s FeLv Sanctuary

When creating PKR we had a common goal, to build a Feline Leukemia and Feline Aids Sanctuary for positive cats. Currently there are not many Sanctuaries in the United States and very little in Texas.

Chloe

If a cat or kitten tests positive for FeLv at a shelter there are generally no options for them. When a staff favorite turns up FeLv positive you are guaranteed to see staff and rescue partners spend countless hours trying to find a solution for this one favorite cat. This is because they all know that a FeLV cat in a shelter will be the least likely to be adopted, therefore the first to be euthanized. With all the sleepless nights from volunteers and all the desperate craigslist ads, they are still generally euthanized before finding a place to go.

It is a hard decision that rescue groups face, whether or not to keep a FeLv positive cat in their group. They are faced with the decision to euthanize or to keep the cat as a long term foster. If the rescue group keeps the cat, they know that he will most likely always be waiting and never find a home. This means that however many the foster parent is willing to foster and adopt out cannot be saved because they are committed to caring only for the FeLv positive cat. The average cat stays in a foster home for no more than 2 months. If a foster takes in as little as 2 cats per two months over a year span, that means that 1 foster has the potential to save 12 cats. Most fosters take in more than 2 cats at a time. This is why most rescue groups have a hard time keeping a FeLv cat. in their program. It is the decision of this 1 cat vs 12 or more that could be saved.

If the rescue group keeps the cat, they know that he will most likely always be waiting and never find a home. This means that however many the foster parent is willing to foster and adopt out cannot be saved because they are committed to caring only for the FeLv positive cat. The average cat stays in a foster home for no more than 2 months. If a foster takes in as little as 2 cats per two months over a year span, that means that 1 foster has the potential to save 12 cats. Most fosters take in more than 2 cats at a time. This is why most rescue groups have a hard time keeping a FeLv cat in their program. It is the decision of this 1 cat vs 12 or more that could be saved.

Meet Chloe! An adorable sweet brown and white tabby female who loves to be pet and talk to other kitties. She is very laid back and a gentle sweetheart.

When we took Chloe into our program she already had an adopter and a forever home waiting for her. While providing a regular checkup for Chloe we discovered that she was positive for FeLv. This was devastating news, we knew as a rescue group that we are far from our future goal of a sanctuary and ultimately the decision that we were going to have to make for Chloe. BUT amazing foster and co-founder Tammie decided that she could not say goodbye to Chloe. Tammie amazingly continued to foster other animals and has had to keep her cats, her foster cats, and Chloe separated for over 4 months now. She has also had to follow a strict routine to prevent spreading FeLv to the other cats. It is now time for Chloe to have a place to stay besides a large kennel. She is always happy and so sweet, we want to build her a perfect custom enclosure until our sanctuary is built. She will be the first cat in our FeLv sanctuary once it is up in running in a couple years.

The custom enclosure is going to consist of a kitty condo, plenty of lounging areas, and places for her to climb and look out at the backyard birdies. But an enclosure to give Chloe among future FeLv cats with plenty of room and entertainment comes with a price! We are raising money for Chloe’s cause and enclosure. be euthanized. With all the sleepless nights from volunteers and all the desperate craigslist ads, they are still generally euthanized before finding a place to go.

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